"Work smarter, not harder ..."

"Work smarter, not harder" is something that sounds good, but in reality it is often a hollow sentence with no substance in it. In the corporate world, when a manager informs his team of staff cuts, while the workload is the same or more, "smarter" does not mean anything other than "do more with less". If this "working smarter" was tangible and doable, then why was it not employed before the staff cuts? Huh?

Here is a Dilbert comic lampooning this misused non-wisdom ...

Dilbert.com

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Comments

Really "Work Smarter, Not

Really "Work Smarter, Not Harder" should be altered to "Work Productively". We might get somewhere before people get laid off, or burnt out, which is really just as bad.

It bugs me when managers say

It bugs me when managers say these kinds of things. When I hear it I can't help but think they actually have no idea how hard or time consuming my work is, and can't be bothered helping to come up with ideas to improve productivity. Nothing but a cop out. Kudos for the Dilbert cartoon too!