Links and Resources on Google Adsense

This article is a collection of some useful material on Adsense in general. The more you know about  the program, the more effectively you can use it on your web site. Start with an overview of the Adsense program, from Google themselves. Then read the Wired article on Google Adsense, as well as the article on Sitepoint. It is a bit dated, but still a good Introduction to Google Adsense. USA Today also has an article on Google Adsense. Then read Google's Adsense Optimization tips are very practical and helpful. A whole subindustry has been spawned by Google's Adsense, such as a web site called TopPayingKeywords.com.  ProBlogger is a blog by Darren Rowse of Australia, on making money from blogging. In February 2005, he was asked whether Google Adsense is making him rich. By September 2005, he said that he is making six figures annually from Adsense as well as other affiliate programs (e.g. Chitika). In another post, he said that Chitika earns him $700 per day, while Google Adsense earned him $15,800 in August. Rowse is not the only one writing about Adsense. For example, you have Eric Giguere, who runs a blog on Adsense, and also wrote a book on Adsense. He happens to live in the same area that I live in.Like any piece of software, Google Adsense is not perfect,  here is what do do when Google serves the wrong Ads. Criticism of Google's "dont talk about Adsense" policy has been voiced, for example, at kottke.org. Anywhere there is money, there is bound to be abuse by some. For example, read about Search Engine Optimization (SEO) and how it is abused by some "consultants". For some tools for adsense, check Digital Point's Adsense sandbox, as well as their chart and graph generator.

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Comments

How long is a piece of string?

How long is a piece of string?

Well, I really meant : what is an "average" web site.

It is very hard to say. Two of my web sites are very variable. They are different audience, different hits/day levels, and different AdSense revenue, of course.

If you used IM, I would have chatted with you, but you are an IRC guy!
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Khalid Baheyeldin

Downside of AdSense--Google's unethical business practices

I found your site while doing searches for Drupal information, and have found it to be both interesting and intelligently written. Thank you!
(/flattery)
:-D

One aspect of AdSense, however, that you haven't yet experienced, is its draconian policy on invalid clicks, which is set up in such a way that you can be penalized for what other people do on (or to) your site, making the AdSense program unsuitable for mission-critical revenue and calling Google's business ethics into question.

There is a practice of Google swamping whereby some advertisers implement bots to seek out and click on competitor's ads in an effort to swamp those competitors' ad budgets. The unfortunate side effect of this is that if the ads on a site are targeted by those bots, Google bans that site from the AdSense program and denies payment of any money earned to date but not yet paid. Emails to AdSense asking them to look into the source of the invalid clicks are met with form letters saying Google will not explain what happened.

I found out about this when an acquaintance of mine was banned from the program through no fault of his own. Fortunately for him, one of his fans happened to work for AdSense and looked into the matter as a personal favor, confirming that the invalid clicks all originated from Linux machines on a very narrow range of IPs, and in a very short time frame. The conclusion reached was that he was not at fault, and he remains the only person I've ever heard of who has been reinstated after being banned.

When it happened to us, though, and to several other webcomic artists, I was shocked, since one would expect a program like this to have some sort of safeguards in place, especially after discovering just how flawed their system is. Other, supposedly "lesser" players in the ad game have an innovative approach to invalid clicks--They *gasp* simply do not count them. It is difficult to beleive that Google hasn't the capability to do the same. They just choose not to.

We complied to the letter and the spirit of our agreement with Google Adsense, going so far as to email them when one of us accidentally clicked on one of our links to let them know about it. Yet based on the actions of someone else, they dropped us (and many others) and refused to explain or look into the matter. They still owe us a couple hundred dollars, and all emails to the program have resulted in (at first) form letters or (later) silence.

I have heard about this

Thanks for sharing that ...

I have heard that some people have gotten their accounts suspended with no explanation, but never from someone who actually knows about it that closely.

It sounds similar to the horror stories of Paypal some have experienced.

I guess this is another case where abuse and misuse of technology limits its usefulness.
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Khalid Baheyeldin